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Anti-Stalin Posters

Anti-Stalin Posters

Source: hro.org (Author), 23/04/10
 
 
 
"Stalin’s role was not one of bringing victory, but rather of unthinkable and unprecedented losses. Stalin is the destruction of the army’s leadership, the annihilation of professional soldiers during 1937-38. Stalin is the extrajudicial annihilation in the 1930s of hundreds of thousands of our fellow countrymen and women who could have fought to defend our nation in 1941. Stalin is the destruction of the defence industry, executions and arrests of leading managers, inventors and engineers. Stalin is the criminal and shameful pact with Hitler in 1939, the supply of raw materials from the Soviet Union to Hitler’s armies and the policy of aggression for which the Soviet Union was excluded from the League of Nations. Stalin is monstrous, political short-sightedness, which led to the catastrophe of the first months of war when Hitler’s army occupied vast areas of territory and captured millions of our soldiers…" – from a Letter from Veterans.
 
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                                                                            A Letter from Veterans
 
Moscow city hall, as part of the celebrations of the 65th anniversary of victory over Nazi Germany, is planning to “decorate” Moscow with portraits of Stalin.
 
We consider this to be blasphemous.
 
Stalin’s role is not one of bringing victory, but rather of unthinkable and unprecedented losses.
 
Stalin is the destruction of the army’s leadership, the annihilation of professional soldiers during 1937-38.
 
Stalin is the extrajudicial annihilation in the 1930s of hundreds of thousands of our fellow countrymen and women who could have fought to defend our nation in 1941.
 
Stalin is the destruction of the defence industry, executions and arrests of leading managers, inventors and engineers.
 
Stalin is the criminal and shameful pact with Hitler in 1939, the supply of raw materials from the Soviet Union to Hitler’s armies and the policy of aggression for which the Soviet Union was excluded from the League of Nations.
 
Stalin is monstrous, political short-sightedness, which led to the catastrophe of the first months of war when Hitler’s army occupied vast areas of territory and captured millions of our soldiers. Stalin did more for the success of the Nazi army than all German field marshals and generals put together.
 
Stalin is a historically unprecedented example of treachery: those soldiers who became prisoners of war because of the actions of the Commander-in-Chief were declared traitors.
 
Before the war we and our families had fully experienced the impact of Stalin’s policies, and we saw the war without the rose-tinted glasses of propaganda.
 
We know about Stalin’s role at first-hand. For us, he is not a matter of fairy tales from Stalinist-era school textbooks or the summaries for students of the Short Course of the History of the Bolshevik Party. He is part of our lives – on the front or in the rear.
 
We did everything for victory not because Stalin ordered us to do so. We were simply defending our homeland that existed for many centuries before Stalin and will exist for many centuries after Luzhkov.
 
At first one might have thought that the idea of Moscow city officials to display portraits of Stalin was a symptom of their incompetence. Only incompetence can explain the words of Yu. M. Luzhkov about “Stalin’s 10 blows” about which he could find no information in contemporary Russian school textbooks. They are a cliché of Stalin era propaganda that has long been discarded.
 
However, after the first critical comments by the public, the mayor’s office began to spew forth such demagoguery that it became clear that this was not simply incompetence, but it was also a conscious attempt to rehabilitate Stalin.
 
None of the critics of the idea of displaying Stalin’s portraits in Moscow advocated a ‘denial of history’ or the ‘deletion of undesirable pages of history’ as Moscow city officials have falsely tried to assert.
 
On the contrary, it is precisely these pages of history – not ‘undesirable’ but ‘tragic’ – that we consider it necessary to remember.
 
Naturally, during the Soviet period the crimes of the Communist regime were never condemned, and Stalin’s crimes were very rarely mentioned. But even after the end of the Soviet regime, for all of the nearly 20 years of Luzhkov’s reign in Moscow, not once has there been a single billboard describing Stalin’s crimes against his own people and against the army.
 
But now for some reason, for the 65th anniversary of victory, Luzhkov is proposing that Muscovites once again look at Stalinist propaganda.
 
We believe that this decision is not just a personal insult to all veterans and to the people who won the victory. We are convinced that this decision is insulting to the entire country and that it undermines Russia’s prestige. Moreover, it undermines the greatness of the victory itself, a victory won at such an enormous cost to human life. It is impermissible to put up billboards with portraits of the executioner and murderer for Victory Day.
 
We call on the mayor of Moscow to rescind his decision.
 
Vladimir Kristapovich Kantovsky, war invalid, GULAG inmate
 
Yury Lvovich Sagalovich, war invalid, Ph.D, former machine gunner and counter-intelligence officer
 
Olga Noevna Kosorez, volunteer who served at the front, served in counter-intelligence, radio-operator and translator
 
Mark Mikhailovich Rafalov, served at the front 1941-1945, Marine captain, participant in the defence of Moscow
 
Yakov Kostiukovsky, war veteran, screenwriter
 
Lev Aleksandrovich Netto, veteran of the Great Patriotic War, GULAG prisoner, participant in the 1953 Norilsk uprising
 
Mark Solomonovich Neifeld, war invalid, honored inventor of Russia, Ph.D in technical sciences
 
Lena Alekseevna Litveiko-Beliakova, veteran of the Great Patriotic War, pediatrician
 
Semen Filippovich Marshak, war invalid, chair of the Council of Veterans of the Great Patriotic War at the Stroidormash Research Centre
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Rights in Russia,
9 May 2010, 12:45
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